INTERIOR PHOTOS OF AVRO LANCASTER B. Mk I (nose section)






Photo Courtesy of Dept. of Defense.



Interior Photos of Avro Lancaster B. Mk I (nose section)

The photos below were taken at Paul Allens's Flying Heritage collection of war-fighter-aircraft at Paine Field, Everett, Wa., USA on Veteran's Day 11/11/09. Help yourself to any of them.

Place in history: The Avro Lancaster was the most successful British bomber aircraft of WWII. The four-engined aircraft was first flown in 1941 and was characterized by its twin-finned tail and large "glasshouse" canopy.

It entered service in 1942 with 44 squadron of the RAF in 1942. Operating mostly at night, they delivered 608,612 tons of bombs in 156,000 sorties against occupied Europe. For its time, the aircraft was fitted with advanced communications, navigation and radar systems.

In April 1945, RAF Lancasters took part in Operation Manna to bring food to the starving peoples of occupied Holland. After the war, the Lancaster and a civilian version, the Lancastrian, were used in the Berlin Airlift.

This aircraft: Avro Lancaster TW911 was built as a B. Mk I (FE) to serve with the RAF's Tiger Force in the Far East, but it was completed too late to see operational service. The aircraft was converted for use as a flying test bed for the Armstrong Siddeley Python engine. The aircraft carried out extensive test flying before it was retired to Southend Aircraft Museum, UK in 1968.

The first photo is of the left side of the back of the nose section. It shows a window and what looks to be a small fire extinguisher.




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These two photos show the nose portion of the aircraft with slots for machine guns.







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