P&S

EIGHT FLAT SIDED GUNS = GOOD MATCHES FOR USE WITH A P&S AIMING AID

S&W BODYGUARD - WATHER PPS - BERETTA PX4

BERETTA NANO - SIG P290 - RUGER LCP

TAURUS PT 738 - KELTEC PF9



THE S&W BODYGUARD

S&W

Photos courtesy of Tactical-Life.com.



THE WALTHER PPS

Walther PPS

Note that the "shorter" magazine sets the gun up for using the middle finger on the trigger and the ring and little fingers on the two finger grip positions then available.

This design clearly provides for placing the index finger along side the gun for aiming, and for using the middle finger to pull the trigger.

The shooting method provides the shooter with automatic and correct sight alignment, and an automatic and correct sight picture for each shot taken. I call it P&S and it is deadly effective at close quarters. Here's a link to a brief on it.

The PPS is slim. It's width at only 23 mm or .91 inches, is great for those with smaller hands.

There is a picture in the Walther manual of the slide being pulled fully to the rear. It gives you an idea of the space above the trigger guard for placement of the index finger. It also shows that the gun design makes it natural to place the index finger there.

If a shooter would have a concern about the index finger being hit by the slide when firing rapidly, a P&S aiming aid would take care of that. Anyone is welcome to add one to their personal firearm/s at their own risk and expense. Here's a link to how-to-add one to a gun info.

As with the new Beretta PX4 (see below), the index finger has to be slanted down to reach the trigger, rather than being "on the level" with the side of the gun so as to pull straight back on the trigger.



THE NEW BERETTA PX4 AND PX4 SUB COMPACT, AND BERETTA NANO

PX4 spacer PX4

PX4 Sub Compact spacer NANO

The pictures below clearly show that they are an excellent match with P&S. They are from the Beretta manual. The picture on the left, shows that the trigger guard is big enough to allow for placing the index finger along side the frame and pulling the trigger with the middle finger. The second picture shows the size relationship between the fingers and the trigger guard. Some well known guns, have "small" trigger guards, which may cause problems when shooting with gloves on.

PX4 spacer PX4

In the two pictures below, the index finger has to be slanted down to reach the trigger, rather than being "on the level" with the side of the gun so as to pull straight back on the trigger. The picture on the left is from the Beretta manual, the second is just a portion of a pic from a Guns&Ammo article on the sub-compact PX4. Both show a two handed grip which is seldom used in CQB.

Beretta spacer Beretta



THE SIG P290

P290 spacer P290



THE RUGER LCP AND THE RUGER LC9

Ruger LCP spacer Ruger LC9

The Ruger LCP has "low profile" sights which are close to no sights at all.



Here are two more small guns that also look to be fine matches for P&S. The Taurus PT 738 has "low profile" sights which are close to no sights at all.

Taurus spacer KEL TEC



I have not shot these small guns, but based on the variety of other guns I have shot, they appear to be almost a perfect match for P&S, and given the chance I will try one out.

A P&S index finger rest could be cut down to 1/2 inch or less and still work just fine. The benefit would be to insure accurate aiming without use of the sights by employing our natural ability to automatically and accurately point at things.

This picture shows that adding a P&S aiming aid to a gun that is carried, may require a modification of a holster. The aiming aid also can be reduced or modified to fit the gun and/or carry need.

G17



Here's a link to info on how to do that.

With all the flat sided mini's coming out with their short back to front radius, the device could be a big help in insuring fast, mechanical, and correct sight alignment, and fast and accurate target engagement (per the U.S. Army's note about pointing and fast and accurate target engagement).

Then, if there are sights on the gun, and if circumstances allow for their use, the sights can and should be used.

Another plus is that, if the light is bad, or the situation is a dynamic one, or if the sights are dark and the target is dressed in black and you are at close quarters, you still will have a viable SD option at your disposal. A couple of magazines, and three or four targets at 15 feet +/-, should prove that to you.

Consider it as a Sight Reliant Shooting assistant/enhancement, not a device to thwart sight use.

Even the NRA, recognizes the need for options.

In Chapter 6 - of the NRA's guide to the basics of personal protection in the home that was published in 2000, we find that "...real-life violent encounters occur at very close range, often in reduced-light conditions, and are over in a matter of seconds. One study of Police shootings in a major urban area showed that the majority of encounters took place after dark, at 3 yards or less, in less than 3 seconds, and involved the firing of an average of three shots."

It goes on to say: "Often, either the assailant or the defender - or both - are moving rapidly during the encounter. Such conditions do not permit the careful alignment of the sights on a specific aiming point on the target."

And if not that, then what will you do?

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